Doing Dinner Right: Compensatory Eats

Doing Dinner Right: Compensatory Eats (Lesson: I should just eat like me and not a wee yoga instructor.) After spending the day at the ByNieves Natural Handmade Body Care production studio—where all afternoon I popped hecka handfuls of fruit & nut granola—I was craving something sans simple starches. Clark Valley Farm Fried Egg: Coincidentally, it was Nieves who awakened me from my narrow vegan vision. Last summer, I spent a week at her farm in Petrolia, just off Northern California’s Lost Coast. There, I got acquainted with about one dozen glossy, heavy laying hens. They had a cozy, private roost and spent their day pecking at organic flax seeds scattered under the a small grove of apple trees. Nothing about that relationship seemed exploitative or ethically compromising. In fact, I was inspired by the harmony and mutuality in the relationship between human animal and non-human animal. What had I been doing being vegan for the past ten years? I remain opposed to factory farms, so-called free-range farms, and most egg production generally—too often, suffering and cruelty in the name of profit is par for the course, even on small farms. However, I am more than comfortable eating eggs from backyard chickens, Nieves’ and Dan’s farm, or from the Clark Valley Farm community-supported agriculture organizaton. Available at Rainbow Grocery, these eggs come from (exceptionally morally) clean hands. Their production practices inspire me, and I’m excited to support their business model and ethical standards. Moreso, an egg fried in top-shelf Stonehouse California Olive Oil and Sel Gris is delicious, y’all. Bubbies Kosher Dill Pickles: Rainbow-sourced. Sliced lengthwise. High-quality fermented vegetables are probiotic powerhouses. I’m down with having them every day. Blanched (Lightly Steamed) Broccoli and Carrots: Rainbow- and locally-sourced. Crazy organic. These bad boys are a world of (nutritious) trouble. I’m particularly passionate about broccoli—for the calcium, sure, but mostly its crunchy, earthy, vaguely sweet, very-vegetable taste. Dun, dun, dun: Despite my (lame?) intentions to eat like one of my Yoga Kula instructors (she’s so wee), two hours after this meal I polished off an entire head of broccoli and a half-sandwich made with one slice Genesis 1:29 Sprouted Nut & Grain Bread, an Annie’s Horseradish Mustard overload, Bubbies Badass Saurkraut, and one-half Field Roast Grain Meat Smoked Apple Sage Sausage. Lesson: I should just eat like me and not a wee yoga instructor.

Doing Dinner Right: Compensatory Eats

(Lesson: I should just eat like me and not a wee yoga instructor.)

After spending the day at the ByNieves Natural Handmade Body Care production studio—where all afternoon I popped hecka handfuls of fruit & nut granola—I was craving something sans simple starches.

Clark Valley Farm Fried Egg: Coincidentally, it was Nieves who awakened me from my narrow vegan vision. Last summer, I spent a week at her farm in Petrolia, just off Northern California’s Lost Coast. There, I got acquainted with about one dozen glossy, heavy laying hens. They had a cozy, private roost and spent their day pecking at organic flax seeds scattered under the a small grove of apple trees.

Nothing about that relationship seemed exploitative or ethically compromising. In fact, I was inspired by the harmony and mutuality in the relationship between human animal and non-human animal. What had I been doing being vegan for the past ten years?

I remain opposed to factory farms, so-called free-range farms, and most egg production generally—too often, suffering and cruelty in the name of profit is par for the course, even on small farms. However, I am more than comfortable eating eggs from backyard chickens, Nieves’ and Dan’s farm, or from the Clark Valley Farm community-supported agriculture organizaton.

Available at Rainbow Grocery, these eggs come from (exceptionally morally) clean hands. Their production practices inspire me, and I’m excited to support their business model and ethical standards.

Moreso, an egg fried in top-shelf Stonehouse California Olive Oil and Sel Gris is delicious, y’all.

Bubbies Kosher Dill Pickles: Rainbow-sourced. Sliced lengthwise. High-quality fermented vegetables are probiotic powerhouses. I’m down with having them every day.

Blanched (Lightly Steamed) Broccoli and Carrots: Rainbow- and locally-sourced. Crazy organic. These bad boys are a world of (nutritious) trouble. I’m particularly passionate about broccoli—for the calcium, sure, but mostly its crunchy, earthy, vaguely sweet, very-vegetable taste.

Dun, dun, dun: Despite my (lame?) intentions to eat like one of my Yoga Kula instructors (she’s so wee), two hours after this meal I polished off an entire head of broccoli and a half-sandwich made with one slice Genesis 1:29 Sprouted Nut & Grain Bread, an Annie’s Horseradish Mustard overload, Bubbies Badass Saurkraut, and one-half Field Roast Grain Meat Smoked Apple Sage Sausage.

Lesson: I should just eat like me and not a wee yoga instructor.

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2 thoughts on “Doing Dinner Right: Compensatory Eats

  1. A beautiful picture, and a beautiful lament Abigail. I love the lesson portion too. Thanks for situating us on the farm, it makes me want to commune with my food. Good writing dear Abigail.

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